Pedagogies of the Pandemic Blog 4: “Mass Appeal”

James McDevitt (Head Teacher, Holy Cross Primary School, Edinburgh)

Photo by Zack Jarosz on Pexels.com

The damaging effects of school closures from March to June 2020 have been well documented. Chief among these have been concerns about the disruption to children’s education, the impact on general attainment levels and especially on those of the most disadvantaged, and the damage to overall health and wellbeing. For Catholic schools, there is an added negative impact: the devastating effect on the spiritual life of our learners.

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Closure of Churches: Safety or Scandal?

Roisín Coll, Fr Stephen Reilly and Anna Blackman

Photo by Rafael Albaladejo on Pexels.com

The announcement on Sunday that we were to enter another severe lockdown left many of us scrambling to get organised for what lies ahead in these next four weeks. Indeed, closure of schools means that teachers and parents alike are having to prepare for another period of challenges where we try to do our best to get things right for our children. Schools across the country are working relentlessly to support the learning of our young people and the established key partnerships with parents, the local communities, local authorities and so on are critical at this time to ensure there is minimum disruption to children’s learning and their health and wellbeing. For Catholic schools in Scotland, one of most significant partnerships in terms of the education of children is the relationship with the Church. Much has been written about the ‘three-legged stool’ or ‘catechetical triangle’ in terms of the religious education of Catholic children and the particular roles of home, parish and school in developing and nurturing children’s faith. Indeed, it is recognised that even with the knowledge that many children in Catholic schools do not attend church with their families, the strong relationship that many priests have with their local Catholic school ensures that the responsibility of the parish to impact on children’s faith is realised. The complete closure of Catholic churches in Scotland once more means that this ‘leg’ of the stool is not able to function as normal and, therefore, may have a negative impact on the faith development and religious education of pupils. We need only remind ourselves of the hundreds of children across the country that have not yet made their First Holy Communion or received the Sacrament of Confirmation, nearly a year on from when they should.  

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