GEN Z RELIGION: THE FUTURE OF THE CHURCH

Photo by Roman Gordienko on Unsplash

Blog by Chiara Dell’Orfanello

For a year now, the lives of each of us have been devastated by the pandemic, and who could have thought that one of its consequences would have been an unprecedented increase in young believers. Recent studies by the University of Columbia indicate a divide between generations: on the one hand the Millennials, most of whom still do not identify with any faith and on the other Gen. Z who, during this period of crisis, reflected on their belief, getting closer and closer to religion. This juxtaposition is not entirely a revival of traditional values and customs, but a rediscovery of a sense of belonging that is not manifested only in worship, but which instead highlights the importance given by young people in applying theological teachings more than in merely hearing them recited.

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The relevance of Philosophy in our Catholic schools

Luca La Monica, teacher of Religious Education, Trinity High, Renfrew

Raffaello Sanzio da Urbino, The School of Athens, Vatican Museums

The teaching of Philosophy as a discipline has a millenary tradition which goes back to Ancient Greece (with regards to the Western world), where it assumed a key role as the highest form of human reasoning. Philosophy has historically maintained an important role up until the start of the XX century, when it has been gradually overshadowed by the rising of scientific subjects. In this way, Philosophy has been marginalized as a purely theoretical and abstract kind of knowledge. This type of definition differs hugely from the one that any Ancient, Medieval or Modern intellectual would have accepted.

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Prophets of the Future 5: Technology and Mental Health in Catholic Schools

In this series, 4th year primary Catholic Teaching Certificate students share the findings of their studies on a new elective course entitled Prophets of a Future not our Own: Catholic Schools and Contemporary Issues.

Nicola Ramsay, MEduc4 student

One of the growing challenges facing the Catholic school system is tackling mental health issues in children and young adults growing up in the technology-driven 21st century. I believe Catholic schools can take action to combat this and create meaningful change.

For many, mental health issues continue into adulthood and lead to harmful consequences which could have been avoided given the correct support and nurture. Schools have increasingly been targeted as sites for mental health promotion and teachers placed to identify issues concerning students’ social and emotional wellbeing, thus there is an expectation that schools can play a major role in reducing impacts of these pressures.

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Prophets of the Future 4: Results-driven Education and Catholic Schools

In this series, 4th year primary Catholic Teaching Certificate students share the findings of their studies on a new elective course entitled Prophets of a Future not our Own: Catholic Schools and Contemporary Issues.

Morgan Healy, MEduc4 student

Today, the view of education as a measure of success is a globalised discourse. Assessment-driven educational systems are controlled by large transnational institutions such as the OECD, with the PISA testing system in particular having a strong influence. This raises the question of how competitive results-driven education specifically effects our schools within the Catholic education system, which seek to balance a commitment to excellence with the non-rivalrous values of the Gospel.

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Lent in Lockdown

Margaret Barton (RE Advisor for Secondary Schools, Archdiocese of St Andrews and Edinburgh)

Photo by Anne McCarthy on Pexels.com

We are journeying through the desert during Lent. Prior to the first lockdown, by the third week of Lent last year, amongst other things, students would have received their ashes in school or their local parish, Lenten lessons would be taught, Lenten pledges made, classes would have received their SCIAF Wee Boxes and be planning fundraising activities, and the school Chaplain would have been offering additional Masses during Lent for pupils and staff to attend.

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Black Holiness Matters

Casey Mullaney (Theology PhD Candidate, University of Notre Dame)

In the United States, we just finished celebrating Black History month. Here in Indiana, we can feel that the days are lengthening and the rays of the sun are getting stronger. We can feel spring coming, and even in the cold of February and early March, there have been glimpses of light and warmth. Black History month feels like that, too. For our Sunday school class, Black History month was a chance to recommit to honoring the courage, creativity, and perseverance of Black people, who as individuals and within their communities have preserved and nurtured the Divine light within themselves throughout centuries of racism. Our young students of all races need and deserve examples of Black excellence, which though abundant, have often been overlooked by majority-white communities, even within the Church.

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